Longest-serving first minister Salmond

Longest-serving first minister Salmond will not ‘go on and on’

Alex Salmond: “I wake up every morning and look forward to the day ahead.”

SNP leader Alex Salmond said he was proud to be Scotland’s longest-serving first minister but he had no intention of going “on and on” in the post.

In interviews with the BBC, the politician added he had no immediate plans to “depart the scene” with the independence referendum due in 2014.

Mr Salmond is Scotland’s fourth first minister and to date the only non-Labour politician to take the post.

Donald Dewar, Henry McLeish and Jack McConnell went before him.

Mr Salmond conceded that his darkest days were around the time of the release of the Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset al-Megrahi.

He said his political high point was his election victory in May 2011 when he delivered a historic majority of MSPs to Holyrood.

Mr Salmond told BBC Scotland’s Raymond Buchanan: “I wake up every morning and look forward to the day ahead.”

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Previous first ministers

Donald Dewar, Henry McLeish and Jack McConnell

1. Donald Dewar: First minister from 13 May 1999 to 11 October 2000

2. Henry McLeish: First minister from 26 October 2000 to 8 November 2001

3. Jack McConnell: First minister from 22 November 2001 to 16 May 2007

He insisted he would not go “on and on”, but added: “I want to see Scotland win the referendum, I want to see the opening of the door of opportunity in that referendum and I have no immediate plans to depart the scene.”

In an earlier interview with BBC Scotland’s Good Morning Scotland programme, Mr Salmond said he was proud of his achievements during his 2002 days in the post.

He told presenter Hayley Millar: “I think the most substantial thing that I am proud of, and the administration should be, is the establishment of a social contract between the Scottish government and the people of Scotland in extraordinarily tough times.

“In these difficult times we have managed to both preserve and indeed extend social objectives like the removal of tuition fees, the protection of free care for the elderly, the importance of having a national health service which is free at the point of need to everyone.

“These are big social protections and advances and that is what I would describe as a social contract between the government and the people.”

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“Start Quote

It was Margaret Thatcher who said in a BBC interview in 1987, after winning her third election victory, that she intended to go “on and on”. Her colleagues duly precluded that option by preventing her from contesting a fourth election.”

image of Brian Taylor Brian Taylor Political editor, Scotland

Following devolution and the first elections to the new Scottish Parliament, Labour grandee Mr Dewar became the first minister on 13 May 1999.

He held the post until his death in October 2000.

Mr McLeish was Scotland’s next first minister, taking on the role from 26 October, 2000, to 8 November, 2001.

By the end of November that year Mr McConnell was in the hot seat. He lasted until May 2007 when the SNP, under the leadership of Mr Salmond, won minority government.

On Wednesday, 7 November, Mr Salmond overtook Mr McConnell’s time in the post.

Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon congratulated the SNP leader on reaching the political milestone.

She said: “The people of Scotland overwhelmingly trust the Scottish government headed by Alex Salmond – 71% trust the Scottish government to act in Scotland’s interests, up from 51% under the previous Lab/Lib Executive in 2006, and compared to just 18% who trust the UK government.

“In 2011, people in Scotland gave a remarkable vote of confidence in Alex Salmond’s leadership and the team, record and vision of the SNP – delivering an overall majority at Holyrood, and becoming the only first minister to win two elections.

“It is this record of success that will help win a yes vote in the referendum for an independent Scotland in autumn 2014.

BBC comments

That would be why Glasgow has some of the worst rates of poverty and lowest life expectancies in Western Europe, then?

 Comment from BBC commenter 1

Euro shows some of the issues with a shared currency between Countries with radically different economies.
Why wouldn’t a Scottish Pound or whatever work?

Scotlands economic strength is closer to S.E. England strength than any other part of the UK (by verified stats) & nowhwere near as disperate as Greece to Germany but it would still be better to have a seperate currency

Comment from BBC commenter 2

In your heart, do you really believe that Scots are getting a materially worse deal other UK citizens? The figures suggest the reverse. There’s ranting about the Poll Tax and other events but the grudge rarely survives close examination and is left hanging as an inarticulate resentment.

Replacing the bogeymen in Westminster with the “smugertariatte” of Holyrood will change nothing.Comment from BBC commenter 3